Trump gives update on vaccine development at White House

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The Ford Motor Co. Michigan Assembly plant stands idle in Wayne, Michigan, on March 23. The Ford Motor Co. Michigan Assembly plant stands idle in Wayne, Michigan, on March 23. Anthony Lanzilote/Bloomberg/Getty Images

With Ford set to reopen it plants across the country on Monday after nearly two months, about 71,000 workers will go back to work and there haven’t been any furloughs or layoffs, according to CEO Jim Hackett.

“I’m trying to keep everyone here. It doesn’t make any sense to put them on the social systems and put them out of work,” he said.

To reopen on Monday, Ford wrote a 70-page handbook on safety measures for its workers, he added.

“The idea is that we design the experience from the worker back,” he said. “We actually did role plays with people in terms of the kinds of questions they have as they come back to work, a day in the life of someone leaving their kids without any supervision because there’s no school, and they need to show up at work. We worked that whole thing end to end so that we could find what we needed to do to make this really work for everyone and that’s what made it 70 pages.”

Some of the safety measures at these plants will include social distancing, testing and the requirement to wear masks. Before the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, two workers would be inside the vehicle as it went down the assembly line. That will no longer happen, according to Hackett.

The automaker had kept some assembly lines open to produce personal protective equipment and ventilators, which will continue to be produced at the plant.

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